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20121201
20121231
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of japan, korea, vietnam, thailand, singapore, indonesia, burma; all of which represent the future of the united states in terms of trade, security and cultural growth in the coming decades. with respect to burma, there was a great moment for me to be able to sit down and see aung san suu kyi recognized by the congress a month or so ago, coming to this country as a member, an elected member of their parliament. we began the change in that relationship from our office, directly from our office based on work that i had begun and become interested in over a period of six years before i was elected to the senate. we, i'm very proud to say, laid the groundwork for the historic visit in 2009 from inside our office. often i would say against the will and against the advice of our own state department. we used validators. we talked to people we knew in the region. i became the only american leader ever to meet with general shui, leader of the military junta, to express my belief that we could work forward to have a different relationship. i met with aung san suu kyi, and i hope that those
for war or peace in this will. t while visiting indonesia,, i thailand, and the philippines ir octoberem i was reminded of thet economic vitality of southeast h asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising. [indiscernible] represent now the fourth larges. export market of the united states. these countries are center stag. to the circumstances with chinaa we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for a free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic fac growth t.lobal more broadly, we face the, specter of global resource constraints, especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. made we have made gains in domestic energy production. dep we remain highly vulnerable still our dependency on oil and equally important, even if we are able to produce more energy and home, we cannot isolate to e ourselves from energy drivenave shocks to the global economy. in other words, we have to cooperate with other nations ing improving the global system of manufacturing and mov
ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia thailand and the philippines in october i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising represent the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage for the circumstances with china . we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen america's economic growth. more broadly we face the specter of global resource constraint especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains in domestic energy production. we remain highly vulnerable still to our dependency on oil. perhaps equally important even if we are able to produce more energy we cannot isolate ourselves from energy driven sharks to the global economy. in other words, we have to cooperate with other nations and imp
including the largest, indonesia, in which the muslims participate in the democracy and you have the political parties within that system, so i think when we have discussions especially these days given the turmoil in the middle east we are very focused on the 20% of the muslim world and six and ten of the muslims live in the pacific region and we need to keep their experiences in mind and think about the death of their experiences, but the main point which i think we all agree on is there is nothing and it is anti-democratic about islam in terms of political culture and needing more than christianity or judea's some so we agree on that point. second, and this is where we disagree. given the middle east which i think we are going to focus on today, the crushing social democratic economic political pressures in the societies are facing a change is coming and i've lived in this part of the world for five years back in 1990 and i go back regularly and support the notion as it is crafted in part because i think it is like debating how gravity. you see the early results in some, not m
with india and indonesia. not really new but integrating partnerships but our partnership with china is critical. as we look at both opportunities to build on cooperation and franken opportunity compete economically and then to avoid any prospect in light of conflict. so those are a critical element. as we think about international institutions including both regional and more broad international institutions, those are a key part of that as well. to us, the other two pieces i'm going to put in our presence. with 60 years of history where the united states has provided a stabilizing role toward economic development, and the fact that most of international trade floats, as the apple noted, is a key part of that. and with a strong interest, not just the asia-pacific region by the international community does. so as we continue to sustain and enhance our presence through a stabilizing function and fun at the end of the day when you have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by othe
nation located strategically between the united states territory of guam, the philippines and indonesia. captured in world war ii, palau became part of the u.s. administered trust territory of the pacific islands. in 1994 it became part of an association which grants the u.s. military rights that the department of state calls -- quote -- "vital to our national security." the compact also provided palau with an initial 15-year assistance and that ended in 2009. the agreement would extend and phase out u.s. assistance by 2024. congress has provided stopgap funding since 2009, but the department of defense wrote to our committee, the committee on energy and natural resources in april of 2011, stating -- quote -- "failure to follow through on our commitments to palau as reflected in the proposed agreement would jeopardize our defense posture in the western pacific." the agreement provides for the phaseout of financial assistance for operation, construction and maintenance. the congressional budget office's ten-year budget estimate for direct spending is $171 million. the u.s. commitment to
mom, a black father, raised in indonesia and hawaii, and i was beginning toceps how fitting in to the world might not be as simple as it might seem. to see this man, this senator, this powerful, accomplished person who was not when it came to what you think a senator might look like at the time. the way he commanded the respect of the entire nation, i think it hinted to me what might be possible in my own life. this was a man who, as a teenager, stepped up to serve his country, even after his fellow japanese-americans were declared enemy aliens. a man who believed in america even when its government didn't necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i couldn't put into words, a powerful sense of hope. as i watched those hearings, listening danny ask those pierces questions night after night, i learned something else. i learned how our democracy was supposed to work, our government, of, and by and for the people. we have a system of government where nobody's above the law, where we have an obligation to hold each other account
to achieve what they wanted. from indonesia to chile, from east germany to; authoritarian regimes have been supplanted by flourishing free societies in just about every corner of the earth. and we in the united states and everybody in the world are a lot better off for it. unfortunately, that can't be said of russia, and that's why this magnitsky act is so important to adopt, despite the democratic setbacks in russia that i've just described, the repressive acts by its government, i remain confident that the future of this great people does not belong to those who would impose upon them a seus tim of -- a system of tyranny, of corruption, of abuse with impunity. the future of russia belongs to russians who believe that they have a right to decide their destiny for themselves. to the russian people who are sick of corruption and who demand the rule of law: fairness, justice under law, in short it belongs to people like the late sergei magnitsky whose name will be immortalized when we pass this legislation. in supporting this legislation, my friends, we stand with them in their noble cause. t
indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen america's economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains in domestic energy production but we remain highly vulnerable still to our dependency on oil. and perhaps equally important, even if we are able to produce more energy at home, we cannot isolate ourselves from energy-driven shocks to the global economy. in other words, we have to cooperate with other nations in improving the global system of manufacturing and moving energy supplies. currently, a key to this is helping to ensure the
is a strategic ally of ours in the western pacific near guam and the philippines and indonesia. last year our defense department wrote "failure to follow through on our commitments to palau as reflected in the proposed agreement would jeopardize our defense posture in the western pacific." it's important that the u.s. demonstrate its reliability as a strategic partner in the pacific by approving this 2010 agreement with palau and meeting our commitments. i urge my colleagues to support the amendment. the presiding officer: who yields time in opposition? mr. bingaman: i'm happy to see the matter dealt with a voice vote. ms. mikulski: i move the amendment be adopted by voice. the presiding officer: if there is no further debate on the amendment, all those -- mr. cochran: the senator from mississippi. mr. sessions: i object to the voice vote. i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. mr. sessions: on -- to speak on this remaining? the presiding officer: there is 30 seconds remaining in opposition. mr. sessions: madam president, this is
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10